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Stink bugs of Australia

How to identify the Pentatomidae of Australia

Posted By: Site Admin Last Updated: Apr 27, 2016 Views: 3445
Key Author(s): Gerry Cassis, Emma Betts and Michael Elliott Key Publisher: Australian Museum Key Version: 1.0
Terrestrial Mollusc Tool

The Terrestrial Mollusc Tool was specifically designed to assist in the identification of adult terrestrial slugs and snails of agricultural importance. The tool also includes species of quarantine significance as well as invasive and contaminant mollusc species commonly intercepted at U.S. ports of entry. This Lucid-based identification tool specifically targets federal, state and other agencies or organizations within the U.S. that are concerned with the detection and identification of molluscs of significance. This tool includes 33 families and 128 species. This resource also includes an interactive identification key, comparison chart, fact sheets, biological and ecological notes, a dissection tutorial, a glossary of commonly used terms, and a list of useful links and references. It should be noted that this dynamic tool is not inclusive of all mollusc pests, as new species of interest arise almost daily.

Posted By: Matthew Trice Last Updated: Sep 14, 2011 Views: 4975
Key Author(s): Jodi White Key Version: v1.0
The Key to Pythium species

The key is presented as a guide to identifying Pythium to the species level. It is a modification of that created by Anna van der Plaats-Niterink (Van der Plaats-Niterink, A. J. 1981. Monograph of the genus Pythium. Studies in Mycology. Baarn, Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures. Monograph No. 21:242). Some but not all species of Pythium are included. This key is only a guide and diagnostic tool to assist in the identification of Pythium species. To learn more about identifying Pythium species, culturing Pythium, and Pythium in general visit https://plantpath.psu.edu/Pythium and work through the Module set. 

Be flexible in your interpretation of what you observe and observe cultures over time. As you gain experience through looking at many different Pythium cultures, you will begin to be able to differentiate sporangia from oogonia, slightly inflated filamentous sporangia from hyphae, and recognize proliferating sporangia. At first, just reading descriptions is confusing, but the more cultures you observe the process will become much easier.

The key was built using the Lucid Builder program. When you open the key, the window is divided into four sections: features available, features chosen, entities remaining and entities discarded. The culture characteristics are present in the Lucid key as “features”. Pythium species are present as “entities”.

As you look at Pythium cultures, check off the characters you observe on the character checklist. Check off characters by expanding the options beneath each main heading of the “features available” section and click on the empty box next to the character you have observed in your culture. When a character is selected, a check mark will be placed next to that character in the “features available” section. These selected characters will also be copied into the “features chosen” section. In order remove a feature chosen, simply click the checked box next to the unwanted character, and it will become unchecked again.  Lastly, as you select the characters you are observing, Pythium species are discarded into the “entities discarded” section, leaving fewer and fewer “entities remaining,” or possible Pythium species.

To help you identify Pythium species, images of the characters are available in the Lucid key. To view these images, make sure that “image thumbnails” is selected under the view tab. Simply expand the contents of the “features available” section and click on the thumbnails to enlarge the images. 

Be flexible in using the key. If you are not certain of a characteristic, select one option for that characteristic and see where the key takes you. When you have eliminated most species, examine the description of the species to which you are led and see if it fits. If the descriptions do not match what you have observed, go back and select a different option for that characteristic and other questionable characters and examine the description of the species to which you come.

Authors:

Gary W. Moorman, Ph.D.
Department of Plant Pathology and Environmental Microbiology
The Pennsylvania State University
111 Buckhout Laboratory
University Park, PA 16802
Phone: 814-863-7401
Email: gmoorman@psu.edu

Sara May
Department of Plant Pathology and Environmental Microbiology
The Pennsylvania State University
220 Buckhout Laboratory
University Park, PA 16802
Phone: 814-865-2204
Email: srm183@psu.edu

Kathleen M. Ayers
Department of Plant Pathology and Environmental Microbiology
The Pennsylvania State University
220 Buckhout Laboratory
University Park, PA 16802
Email: kma5209@psu.edu

Posted By: Site Admin Last Updated: May 21, 2014 Views: 3319
Key Author(s): Gary W. Moorman, Ph.D., Sara May, Kathleen M. Ayers Key Version: 1.0
The moss genus Bryum in Switzerland

Taxonomic scope: Bryophytes

Description: The genus Bryum is one of the most challenging genera of bryophytes. This key contains 47 species known from Switzerland and adjacent countries. Nearly all characters are illustrated with microscopical photographs.

Posted By: Site Admin Last Updated: Apr 29, 2015 Views: 9535
Key Author(s): H. Hofmann & K. Lotterman Key Version: 2.0
The moss genus Orthotrichum in Switzerland

Taxonomic scope: Bryophytes

Description: The moss genus Orthotrichum is of particular interest in monitoring air pollution. This key contains 31 species known from Switzerland and adjacent countries. Nearly all characters are illustrated with microscopical photographs.

For more information: http://www.swissbryophytes.ch/content/schluessel12

Posted By: Site Admin Last Updated: Mar 8, 2016 Views: 3515
Key Author(s): H. Hofmann, M. Lüth & A. Büschlen Key Version: 1.0
Thrips of Brazil

The Thysanoptera fauna of Brazil is one of the most diverse in the world. More than 530 species were described based on material collected in Brazilian territory and approximately 700 species are recorded from this country. This number represents more than 10% of the species described in the Thysanoptera. Besides the large number of species, the Brazilian fauna is also diverse in terms of ecology and life histories.

In this identification system, the user can identify the 6 Thysanoptera families that occur in Brazil.

Posted By: Site Admin Last Updated: Feb 15, 2018 Views: 18756
Key Author(s): Adriano Cavalleri, Laurence A. Mound, Mariana F. Lindner, Marcos Botton, Milton de Souza Mendonça Jr. Key Version: Feb 2018
Thrips of California

Thrips are all about us, whether naturally in the flowers, leaves and dead branches of native Californian plants, or as invasive pests in homes and crops. With this, the first overview in 40 years of a major part of the North American Thysanoptera fauna, the authors aim to interest more people in the biology of these fascinating insects, as well as provide an up-to-date teaching resource. Equipped with a good compound microscope, amateur and professional entomologists, biology students and their teachers, conservation and land managers, environmental consultants and anyone interested in the diversity of the natural world will value this remarkable tool.

Posted By: Site Admin Last Updated: May 16, 2012 Views: 3516
Key Author(s): Mark S. Hoddle, Laurence A. Mound, Dena Paris Key Publisher: CBIT Key Version: 09 ed.
Thrips of the British Isles

Thysanoptera Britannica et Hibernica

Thrips of the British Isles

This identification and information system includes 177 species of thrips that have been taken alive on the British Isles at least once. It provides a means of identifying species, together with an introduction to what is known of the biology and distribution of each species. The identification system is based largely on adult females as this is the life stage most commonly collected. Printed identification keys that similarly deal with adults of the British thrips fauna include Mound et al, (1976) and zur Strassen (2003), and for larvae an extensive introduction is provided by Vierbergen et al. (2010).

This publication should be cited as follows: Mound LA, Collins DW, Hastings A (2018). Thysanoptera Britannica et Hibernica - Thrips of the British Isles. Lucidcentral.org, Identic Pty Ltd, Queensland, Australia.

Posted By: Site Admin Last Updated: Nov 16, 2018 Views: 1020
Key Author(s): Laurence Mound, Dom Collins, Anne Hastings Key Publisher: Identic Pty Ltd Key Version: 1.0
Thysanoptera Aotearoa (Thrips of New Zealand)

There have been few studies on the thrips of New Zealand. Most of the information presented in this system is derived from two Fauna of New Zealand volumes (Mound & Walker 1982; 1986). However, much of the data in those two volumes was derived from limited amounts of field work, both in space and time. Particularly missing are biological studies on thrips species that are native to New Zealand, with many of these remaining known from very few specimens.

Only for some Thripidae have there been studies on biology and host-plant range. Teulon & Penman (1990) produced outstanding data on the diversity of plants on which Thrips obscuratus breeds. Martin & Mound (2004) explored the host associations of several species, and Martin (2017) provided good data on the host plants of Panchaetothripinae in New Zealand.

For the many species of fungus-feeding Phlaeothripidae there have been no studies on biology or behaviour, although the sexual dimorphism and male polyphenism many such species exhibit suggests the existence of competitive behaviours.

Posted By: Site Admin Last Updated: Oct 19, 2017 Views: 19826
Key Author(s): Mound LA, Nielsen M & Hastings A Key Publisher: Lucidcentral.org, Identic Pty Ltd, Queensland, Australia. Key Version: 2017
Thysanoptera Chinensis

Thripidae Genera from China

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This identification and information system includes 98 genera of the Thysanoptera family Thripidae that are thought to occur in China. This number is certain to increase, with expanding field studies on the Oriental and Holarctic components of the fauna of this highly diverse country.

This system provides information on biology and distribution wherever possible, but little is known about how most thrips species spend their lives. All thrips show some specificity in their host plant associations, and some species are fully dependent for survival on one, or a restricted range, of plant species. One objective of this user-friendly system is to encourage more students in China to discover the larval host plants on which particular thrips species are dependent to maintain populations.

Posted By: Site Admin Last Updated: Jul 30, 2018 Views: 6541
Key Author(s): Zhang SM, Mound LA, & Hastings A (2018). Thysanoptera Chinensis. Key Publisher: Lucidcentral.org, Identic Pty Ltd, Queensland, Australia. Key Version: 1.0
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