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Lasiocnemus key Dikow 2007

Key to species of Lasiocnemus (Insecta: Diptera: Asilidae) based on the taxonomic revision by Dikow 2007 (doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.4001/1021-3589-15.1.57)

Posted By: Site Admin Last Updated: Apr 22, 2015 Views: 3057
Key Author(s): Torsten Dikow
Lace bugs of Australia

How to identify the Tingidiae of Australia

Posted By: Site Admin Last Updated: Apr 27, 2016 Views: 3010
Key Author(s): Gerry Cassis and Matthew Bulbert Key Publisher: Australian Museum Key Version: 1.0
Plant Families of southern Africa

Plant Families of southern Africa

Southern Africa has a total of 225 plant families with the 52 largest families covering over 90% of the flora. A book entitled ‘Plant Families of southern Africa’ was published in 2013 to review the 52 largest families. This book aims to introduce readers to the beauty and diversity of our fascinating flora, and to enable scholars, students, amateurs and professionals alike to identify plants to family level. This key is an adaptation of the contents of the book into an interactive tool.

Key characters for identification of each family are illustrated by photographs and each family is further illustrated by photographs of representative members of that family. Although the key focuses on southern African members of the families, it will also be useful in other parts of Africa and the world.

Posted By: Site Admin Last Updated: Jun 2, 2014 Views: 2988
Key Author(s): KOEKEMOER, M., STEYN, H.M. & BESTER, S.P. Key Version: 1.0
Key to Order & Superfamily of Australian Collembola

This key covers all 14 families of Collembola known from Australia.  Few Collembola are truly aquatic and some families such as Cyphoderidae (ant inquilines) and Oncopoduridae (cave and soil species) would rarely be met in aquatic samples.  But members of almost any family may occur in aquatic samples.

Identification of Collembola to superfamily is relatively easy.  The fat, pudgy ones are Poduroidea (families Neanuridae, Odontellidae, Brachystomellidae, Hypogastruridae, Onychiuridae).  The globose ones are Sminthuroidea (Sminthuridae, Dicyrtomidae) or, if under 0.5mm, eyeless, and white, yellow or grey, Neelidoidea (Neelidae).  The remainder, which are elongate and (i) with short appendages but having the body not strongly rounded or (ii) with long antennae, legs and furca, are Entomobryoidea (Isotomidae, Entomobryidae, Paronellidae, Cyphoderidae, Oncopoduridae, Tomoceridae).

Identification below superfamily level can be difficult and it seems some families of Entomobryoidea are poorly defined.  Some atypical members of some families may key to a related family or to no family.  In cases of doubt, keyed specimens should be checked against the text description in the taxon information box.

Posted By: Site Admin Last Updated: Aug 8, 2012 Views: 2975
Key Author(s): CSIRO Entomology Key Version: 1.1
Key to Nearctic Trissolcus Ashmead

Identification key to the Nearctic species of Trissolcus and two potential biocontrol agents, T. cultratus and T. japonicus

Posted By: Site Admin Last Updated: Mar 26, 2015 Views: 2901
Key Author(s): Elijah Talamas, Norman Johnson, Matt Buffington Key Version: 1.0
Key to Species of Australian Caenidae (Ephemeroptera) Larvae

(Ephemeroptera) Larvae

Acknowledgements

Andrew Cranston and Ben Gunn for compiling the key and attaching character state images.

References

Dean, J. C. and Suter, P. J.  (1996)  Mayfly Nymphs of Australia: A Guide to Genera.  Co-operative Research Centre for Freshwater Ecology, Thurgoona.

Suter, P. J.  (1999)  Illustrated Key to the Australian Caenid Nymphs (Ephemeroptera: Caenidae).  Co-operative Research Centre for Freshwater Ecology, Thurgoona.

Posted By: Site Admin Last Updated: Aug 8, 2012 Views: 2884
Key Author(s): CSIRO Entomology Key Version: 1.1
Key to Orders of Australian Aquatic Arthropoda

This intermediate-level key covers the huge and diverse phylum Arthropoda.

The major classes of arthropod found in inland waters are Crustacea (all life stages) and Insecta (adults and/or larvae and/or pupae).  Lesser components of the fauna include Arachnida (mites, spiders), Myriapoda (millipedes) and Collembola (springtails).

Arthropods have in common a segmented body which is differentiated into regions, an external chitinous cuticle, and paired jointed appendages (as gills, swimming organs, walking legs, antennae, chelicera, etc.).  Appendages may be absent in some juvenile forms.  The mouth is more or less anterior, the gut usually straight and the anus sub-terminal.  The nervous system is patterned on a dorsal brain with paired ventral nerve cords and paired ganglia in each body segment.  An open, dorsal heart circulates haemolymph around the body cavity.

Some arthropods appear worm-like, notably apodous (maggot-like) insect larvae although the body always is clearly segmented and there almost always is a well-developed head with biting, jointed mouthparts.  In some families of Diptera (true flies) the larvae are legless, eyeless, and apparently headless (the head is small and retractile).  Paired unjointed prolegs, hooks, gills or other appendages often are present in these species.

This Key to Arthropoda takes (1) minor groups directly to family level, (2) others to ordinal level or else to artificial but readily recognisable groupings, within which each component is then identified to family level in a separate key, (3) some Crustacean taxa to intermediate levels, in which families are recognised but not keyed.

Posted By: Site Admin Last Updated: Aug 8, 2012 Views: 2872
Key Author(s): CSIRO Entomology Key Version: 1.1
Key to the Haemodoraceae of Western Australia

Chris Hollister & Kevin Thiele

Western Australian Herbarium, Perth

Version: 11 January 2013

Acknowledgements

We are grateful to many friends and colleagues working at the WA Herbarium for supplying diverse data, images, maps, ideas, and taxonomic and computing expertise that have made the development of this data set possible. In particular we wish to thank Rob Davis and Mike Hislop for photos and taxonomic help, and Karina Knight for her help and encouragement throughout the project. We note that the photographic species images available here come from the WA Herbarium’s online plant information system, FloraBase, and represent the work of a team of dedicated volunteers. The maps, also part of FloraBase, represent specimens held at the WA Herbarium. We thank Skye Coffey for the CD cover.

Posted By: Site Admin Last Updated: Feb 22, 2016 Views: 2822
Key Author(s): Chris Hollister and Kevin Thiele Key Publisher: Western Australian Herbarium Key Version: 20130111
Key to Genera of Australian Caenidae (Ephemeroptera) Larvae

(Ephemeroptera) Larvae

Acknowledgements

Andrew Cranston and Ben Gunn for compiling the key and attaching character state images.

References

Dean, J. C. and Suter, P. J. (1996) Mayfly Nymphs of Australia: A Guide to Genera.  Co-operative Research Centre for Freshwater Ecology, Thurgoona.

Suter, P. J.  (1999)  Illustrated Key to the Australian Caenid Nymphs (Ephemeroptera: Caenidae).  Co-operative Research Centre for Freshwater Ecology, Thurgoona.

Posted By: Site Admin Last Updated: Aug 8, 2012 Views: 2796
Key Author(s): CSIRO Entomology Key Version: 1.1
Staphylinidae Subfamilies of North America North of Mexico

The rove beetles (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae) are the largest beetle family with over 52,000 species worldwide. The family is divided into 32 subfamilies, 26 of which are found in the new world. The purpose of this key is to facilitate identification of adult North American staphylinids to subfamily.

The key is largely based on Moore and Legner (1979), Newton et al. (2001), and O’Keefe (2001).

Questions, comments, corrections, etc. should be emailed to Mike at  spongymeosphyll@gmail.com.

Posted By: Site Admin Last Updated: Mar 20, 2015 Views: 2739
Key Author(s): Michael L. Ferro, Margaret K. Thayer, Alfred F. Newton, Jr., and Jong-Seok Park. Key Version: 1.0
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